Post image for Ballantine’s Finest

Ballantine’s Finest

by Oliver Klimek on January 23, 2011

40%


My Tasting Notes:

Colour: Medium caramel
Nose: Grain spirit enhanced by nuts, orange zest, nutmeg and a faint whiff of smoke.
Palate: Gentle peat, caramel, roasted hazelnuts, hints of citrus and cinnamon.
Finish: Medium long and mild.
Overall: One of the more recommendable entry level blends. The nose is nothing to speak of, but it’s not entirely unpleasant on the palate.

Rating: 73/100 – Price Tag $$$$$ – Value for your Money $$$$$

Buy Ballantine’s Finest at Master of Malt

Related Post

{ 4 comments… read them below or add one }

nulty January 25, 2011 at 9:17 am

I agree, one of those entry level blends that doesn’t need Coke to get down.

Reply

J White January 31, 2011 at 4:20 am

Just bought. Wheres my smoke? Wheres that grainy texture? Bit boring. I say go put your money elsewhere and buy 12 or 17 if you have that sorta money for a blend. Previous had 60′s bottle. Wonderful Natural Slow Wood smoke (what malt is that?). small creme soft citrus malt layer and the very grainy refine nice grains (what distiller?) holing it together. I was happy with this. I should of got the 12 (never had) so it would be closer to my 60s finest quality. Can anyone tell the grains in the starter blends are the same in the age stated products?

Reply

Oliver Klimek January 31, 2011 at 4:55 am

I think you can’t really expect a new whisky to taste like a bottle that is over 40 years old. And you’d really enver know if the old whisky tasted the same 40 years ago because it will have changed in the bottle. I suspect that the 12 and 17 year old will be not more similar to that than the NAS.

Reply

J White February 1, 2011 at 1:45 pm

Well why was there this Incredible huge Oakey Aroma in the 3 1960s standard blends I was lucky to get come from? Did it just intensify or simply its better back then? I bought them in shop and were not oaky just spirity first? Obvious the cardboard effect is from the decades in there but there was so much oak.

Reply

Leave a Comment

{ 1 trackback }

Previous post:

Next post: